September 21, 2017

How Do I Know If My Bank Is FDIC Insured?

US Shuts a Big Bank DownWhether you use a traditional or online bank that has no physical offices, it is a good idea to ensure that the institution is legitimate and that you know how safe your deposits are.

Most bank Web sites have an "About Us" section or something similar that describes the institution. You may find a brief history of the bank, the official name and address of the bank’s headquarters, and information about its insurance coverage from the FDIC.

For example, watch out for copycat Web sites that deliberately use a name or Web address very similar to, but not the same as, that of a real financial institution. The intent is to lure you into clicking onto their Web site and giving your personal information, such as your account number and password. Always check to see that you have typed the correct Web site address for your bank before conducting a transaction.

To verify a bank’s insurance status, look for the familiar FDIC logo or the words "Member FDIC" or "FDIC Insured" on the Web site.

Also, you should check the FDIC’s online database of FDIC-insured institutions. You can search for an institution by going to Bank Find (formerly “Is My Bank Insured?”).

Some bank Web sites provide links directly to the FDIC’s Web site to assist you in identifying or verifying the FDIC insurance protection of their deposits.

Also remember that not all banks operating on the Internet are insured by the FDIC. Many banks that are not FDIC-insured are chartered overseas. If you choose to use a bank chartered overseas, it is important for you to know that the FDIC may not insure your deposits. Check with your bank or the FDIC if you are not Broken Bank certain.

For insurance purposes, be aware that a bank may use different names for its online and traditional services; this does not mean you are dealing with separate banks.

This means, for example, that to determine your maximum FDIC insurance coverage, your deposits at the parent bank will be added together with those at the separately named bank Web site and will be insured for up to the maximum amount covered for one bank. Talk to your banker if you have questions.

Non-deposit investment and insurance products, such as mutual funds, stocks, annuities and life insurance policies that may be sold through Web sites or at the bank itself, are not FDIC-insured, are not guaranteed by the bank, and may lose value.